Fuck Yeah, Old Time Fatties!
If you haven’t followed us over, you’re missing out on some badass Old Time Fatties

We’ve got a new home and some brand new old fatties to share. Check it out!

We’re closing up shop!

But fear not, it’s a simple move across town. When I created Fuck Yeah, Old Time Fatties, I was completely clueless as to the fact that I could create multiple blogs under one Tumblr identity. In order to consolidate my shit, I have recreated this blog so that I can keep everything under one roof.

The new location is simply called Old Time Fatties.

I’ve got a few new items ready to post this week and will be working on adding additional resources soon. Please follow us at our new home and reblog. Thanks!

Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, wife of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

Thanks to grrlyman for submitting this stereoscopic image, which I have converted to an animated GIF. Thank you kindly!

Thanks to grrlyman for submitting this stereoscopic image, which I have converted to an animated GIF. Thank you kindly!

Apologies —

Free time at work is when I get to search for old photos and lately it’s been super-busy. Thanks for the submission, Deidre!

Washington, D.C., circa 1925. “F.G. Lindsay store front, Anacostia, 2215 Nichols Avenue.” Exterior of the grocery seen here. National Photo Co. View full size.

Washington, D.C., circa 1925. “F.G. Lindsay store front, Anacostia, 2215 Nichols Avenue.” Exterior of the grocery seen here. National Photo Co. View full size.

Washington, D.C., circa 1922. “Corby’s laboratory.” Another look at Mrs.  M.M. Brooke, “chemist in charge of the Corby Baking Company  laboratory,” also seen here. National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

Washington, D.C., circa 1922. “Corby’s laboratory.” Another look at Mrs. M.M. Brooke, “chemist in charge of the Corby Baking Company laboratory,” also seen here. National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

1917. “Camp Meade, Maryland. Miscellaneous views.” Coalstove cookery at  today’s Fort Meade. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

1917. “Camp Meade, Maryland. Miscellaneous views.” Coalstove cookery at today’s Fort Meade. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

March 2, 1914. “Margarete Ober.” The Metropolitan Opera mezzo-soprano  with a nice rib roast. 8x10 glass negative, G.G. Bain Collection. View full size.

March 2, 1914. “Margarete Ober.” The Metropolitan Opera mezzo-soprano with a nice rib roast. 8x10 glass negative, G.G. Bain Collection. View full size.

Washington, D.C., circa 1918. “Food Administration War Kitchen, 926  McPherson Street.” National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

Washington, D.C., circa 1918. “Food Administration War Kitchen, 926 McPherson Street.” National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

My dad’s side of the family

My dad’s parents immigrated to NYC from southern Italy in the 1920s.  Most of the family was/is fat.  

1937. “Little did Mrs. Mark Bristol realize when she baked, Virginia  style, a couple of hams for friends a few years ago that it would  eventually develop into a lucrative business for her. The flavor of the  hams so intrigued the friends that they passed the word on to others,  and as a result Mrs. Bristol now bakes thousands of hams every year in  her kitchen on fashionable Massachusetts Avenue and ships them to all  parts of the world. Even the Duke of Windsor is now one of her best  customers. It takes Mrs. Bristol four days to prepare a ham according to  her specially formulated recipe. It is first soaked and simmered for  days, and then while baking, it is sprinkled with cloves, pineapple and  basted with sherry, brandy or applejack. The hams are originally  obtained from a special farm in Virginia where they have been smoked in  the real Dixie manner. Mrs. Bristol frequently inspects the ham while is  it in the simmering process. Her Virginia cook and first assistant,  Mamie, wraps the meat.” Harris & Ewing glass negative. View full size.

1937. “Little did Mrs. Mark Bristol realize when she baked, Virginia style, a couple of hams for friends a few years ago that it would eventually develop into a lucrative business for her. The flavor of the hams so intrigued the friends that they passed the word on to others, and as a result Mrs. Bristol now bakes thousands of hams every year in her kitchen on fashionable Massachusetts Avenue and ships them to all parts of the world. Even the Duke of Windsor is now one of her best customers. It takes Mrs. Bristol four days to prepare a ham according to her specially formulated recipe. It is first soaked and simmered for days, and then while baking, it is sprinkled with cloves, pineapple and basted with sherry, brandy or applejack. The hams are originally obtained from a special farm in Virginia where they have been smoked in the real Dixie manner. Mrs. Bristol frequently inspects the ham while is it in the simmering process. Her Virginia cook and first assistant, Mamie, wraps the meat.” Harris & Ewing glass negative. View full size.

heyfatchick:

sleepydumpling:

Wait… weren’t there no fat people before 1980?

 LOOK AT THEIR AWESOME HATS.

heyfatchick:

sleepydumpling:

Wait… weren’t there no fat people before 1980?

 LOOK AT THEIR AWESOME HATS.